WVU history faculty earn prestigious NEH fellowships

An unprecedented two scholars from West Virginia University have received the top fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Katherine Aaslestad and Tamba M’bayo, both professors in the Department of History, will each receive $60,000 for the 2019-2020 academic year to conduct research for their respective book projects.

WVU Libraries lead effort to create Morgantown Public Art Guide

The John F. Kennedy Memorial in Start City and the restored 1953 Coca-Cola mural on a High Street building are just two of the 44 local attractions detailed in the new Morgantown Public Art Guide, a collaborative initiative among West Virginia University Libraries, the Greater Morgantown Convention and Visitors Bureau, the Art Museum of WVU, College of Creative Arts, Arts Monongahela, and theclio.com, a free nonprofit website that lists historic and cultural sites across the United States.

WVU joins national initiative to increase college access, graduates

West Virginia University is joining with scores of universities in a national initiative to increase college access, close the achievement gap and significantly produce more degrees by 2025. “Powered by Publics” is an initiative of the Association of Land-Grant and Public Universities and involves 130 schools, gathered into 16 different clusters around regions, size and/or mission.

WVU opens Veteran and Military Family Support Headquarters

A new Veteran and Military Family Support Headquarters underscores West Virginia University’s commitment to those who have served our country. WVU President Gordon Gee and the WVU Center for Veteran, Military and Family Programs hosted a grand opening and ribbon-cutting ceremony for the new center Friday, Dec. 7 at the Mountainlair.

WVU study suggests loneliness can hinder management of diabetes, hypertension

One isn’t just the loneliest number. It may also be the unhealthiest. New research led by Laurie Theeke, a professor and nurse practitioner in the WVU School of Nursing, suggests that loneliness can make it harder for middle-aged Appalachians to manage chronic conditions such as diabetes, obesity and high blood pressure.