WVU reinforces humanities studies through creative research and fellowships

The Humanities Center at West Virginia University is reinforcing the relevance of humanistic inquiry and research devoted to the study of human thought, culture and history. And it’s highlighting how learning the skills and thinking to thrive in today’s globalized society is more important than ever.

Memorial fund established by Coach Huggins advances West Virginia cancer care

WVU Men’s Basketball Coach Bob Huggins launched the Norma Mae Huggins Cancer Research Fund after his mother lost her battle with colon cancer in 2003. To date, the fund has raised about $5 million to support clinical research trials for cancer patients in West Virginia. But, to the patients and physicians impacted by those funds, the value is priceless.

Clean water and compassion: A recipe to rebuild a hurricane-ravaged island

Jason Hubbart, a professor of hydrology and water quality at the Davis College of Agriculture, Natural Resources and Design, was asked by Barbuda officials in 2018 to come help assess the island’s freshwater resources. Apparently, throughout the island’s history, the quality of water has never been professionally tested.

Helicopter parents and ‘hothouse children’—WVU researcher explores the high stakes of family dynamics

Kristin Moilanen, associate professor of child development and family studies, said the phenomenon of helicopter parenting most often occurs in middle- to upper-class families where stakes are high for parents to be able to show off their children’s success. Her research, which focuses on young adults 18- to 24- years-old, indicates that high helicopter parenting leads to “low mastery, self-regulation and social competence.”

Too much light may darken mood of hospital patients, say WVU researchers

This time of year can cause trouble for people with seasonal affective disorder, a type of depression that the waning daylight of autumn evokes. But new research by West Virginia University researchers Randy Nelson and Courtney DeVries suggests that getting too much light—instead of too little—may trigger depression, too.