WVU engineers receive $3 million DOE award to capture emissions at shale gas production sites

A three-year collaborative project to develop a new low-cost process to convert the natural gas that is commonly flared at industrial sites could benefit a number of industrial sectors including the carbon fiber industry, carbon composite, electronics, electrical arc steel making, polymer additives and many others, all while having a positive effect on the economy and environment.

WVU and Pitt team up for laser trial to treat glaucoma

Glaucoma is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in the world. A new study to be conducted by the West Virginia University and the University of Pittsburgh seeks to change that. The National Eye Institute recently awarded the universities $15.2 million to study how a treatment called selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) can be better used to treat glaucoma.

Test, isolate, communicate: Keys to controlling a COVID-19 outbreak in a long-term care facility

Widespread COVID-19 testing may be an obvious way to control an outbreak in a long-term care facility. But communication among the facility’s staff, its residents and the residents’ family members is crucial, too. A new study led by Carl Shrader, a physician and researcher in the Department of Family Medicine in the West Virginia University School of Medicine, revealed the role that communication played in quashing a COVID-19 outbreak at Sundale, a long-term care facility in Morgantown.

WVU students lead upgrades to Green Bank Telescope

A critical advancement for astrophysics research led by a team of West Virginia University physics and astronomy students will allow astronomers to be seven times faster in mapping a galaxy. The new radio camera at the Green Bank Telescope is the first of its kind in the U.S.

WVU researcher: Racial and economic inequity a rural problem, too

As the United States experiences mass racial unrest and nationwide protests, equity issues have become elevated in the American consciousness. According to Erin McHenry-Sorber, an associate professor of higher education in the West Virginia University College of Education and Human Services, this reckoning with racial and economic inequity isn’t just happening in urban areas.

Using artificial intelligence to predict genuine outcomes in COVID-19 patients

Artificial intelligence can do more than recommend a song or suggest what to write in an email. It might even be able to predict outcomes in COVID-19 patients. Larissa Casaburi—a researcher in the WVU School of Medicine—and her colleagues are using artificial intelligence to study how being a coal miner affects COVID-19 outcomes. She’s also investigating the ways smoking, vaping and having chronic lung disease influence how COVID-19 patients fare.