WVU researcher studies new treatment for pancreatic cancer

One reason pancreatic cancer is so lethal is its resistance to traditional chemotherapy. But West Virginia University surgical oncologist Brian Boone is exploring whether FOLFIRINOX—a new combination of cancer drugs—can improve outcomes in patients whose pancreatic cancer is “borderline resectable,” meaning that a tumor may be too close to a blood vessel to be removed safely.

WVU School of Nursing receives 10-year accreditation

The West Virginia University School of Nursing today (June 13) announced that its baccalaureate degree, master’s degree, Doctor of Nursing Practice and post-graduate Advanced Practice Registered Nurse certificate programs have been granted accreditation by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education for another 10 years.

WVU and NIOSH study ways to prevent lung disease in dentistry professionals

Inhaling dangerous particulates is a hazard of coal mining, mold remediation, sandblasting … and dentistry. Fotinos Panagakos, associate dean of research at the West Virginia University School of Dentistry, is collaborating with a team at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health to study how microscopic, airborne particulates and gases might be generated during dental procedures. NIOSH—a division of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention—is funding the project.

WVU study links exposure to chemicals found in household items to lower heart disease rates in diabetics

Kim Innes, of the WVU School of Public Health, and her colleagues recently discovered that greater exposure to perfluoroalkyl substances was associated with lower rates of existing coronary heart disease in adults with diabetes. PFAS, considered a public health threat by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, are manufactured chemicals that were popularized by various industries in the 1940s because of their ability to repel oil and water.

WVU biostatistician studies link between microbiome and preterm birth

Pregnant African American women are more likely than white women to give birth prematurely, but they’re underrepresented in studies of preterm birth rates. Snehalata Huzurbazar, a biostatistics professor in the West Virginia University School of Public Health, is working to change that.