Mountaineer Medical Scholarship established to support School of Medicine Charleston students

Dr. James P. Griffith and his wife Marla have established the Dr. James P. and Marla R. Griffith Mountaineer Medical Scholar program. A $20,000 commitment, the scholarship will be awarded to a student who chooses to further his or her education on the West Virginia University Health Sciences Charleston Campus, with preference given to those from West Virginia and/or Roane County and who have an interest in internal medicine and/or psychiatry.

WVU researchers use telehealth to head off hospitalizations and ER visits

West Virginia University researcher Steve Davis is piloting an intervention program that uses telehealth to connect rural West Virginians with nurses who can help them manage—and even prevent—conditions like these. The program will focus on individuals being discharged from long-term care facilities as they transition to life back at home.

WVU researcher explores link between intercellular communication and incurable blindness

West Virginia University researcher Jianhai Du is investigating how the retina pigment epithelium turns proline—an amino acid—into fuel that the retina can easily burn. Using animal models and primary human cells, he and his team discovered that if the RPE can’t process proline properly, the retina is undernourished, and retinal degenerative diseases result. Their findings, which appear in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, may point to innovative treatments that make incurable blindness preventable.

Nutritional supplements and diets not always protective, WVU research suggests

Do the nutritional supplements people take or the diets they adhere to actually protect them against cardiovascular problems and death? Maybe not, suggests a new umbrella review of meta-analyses and randomized controlled trials by Safi Khan, an assistant professor in the West Virginia University School of Medicine. His findings appear in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

WVU to partner with Pitt to study opioid use in Appalachia

West Virginians may gain better access to investigational approaches to managing and preventing substance abuse disorders related to the ongoing opioid epidemic as part of a collaborative $5.8 million grant from the National Institutes of Health.

WVU researcher studies new treatment for pancreatic cancer

One reason pancreatic cancer is so lethal is its resistance to traditional chemotherapy. But West Virginia University surgical oncologist Brian Boone is exploring whether FOLFIRINOX—a new combination of cancer drugs—can improve outcomes in patients whose pancreatic cancer is “borderline resectable,” meaning that a tumor may be too close to a blood vessel to be removed safely.