WVU’s top seniors named, eight honored with 2019 Order of Augusta

An Olympic gold medalist, a retired master sergeant of the U.S. Air Force, a musician, a humanitarian and a legacy who has carried on the Mountaineer spirit as the 21st family member to attend West Virginia University are among those who will receive WVU’s highest student honor, the Order of Augusta.

Summer camps at WVU provide many opportunities for youth to explore

Summer camp season at West Virginia University begins in May and offers many options for young people to engage both academically and physically during their summer break. Summer camps are known for providing a safe environment where children gain self-confidence as they learn new skills.

WVU Board begins process to extend President Gee’s contract

The West Virginia University Board of Governors began the process Friday of a state-mandated periodic evaluation of President Gordon Gee, and also set guidelines for a possible renewal of his contract beyond its June 30, 2021 expiration.

WVU researchers identify how light at night may harm outcomes in cardiac patients

Orange-lensed glasses may be a simple, affordable way to help cardiac patients recover better, suggests research by Randy Nelson, chair of the WVU Department of Neuroscience, and Courtney DeVries, the John T. and June R. Chambers Chair of Oncology Research at WVU. Using animal models, they found that exposure to white light at night triggered inflammation, killed brain cells and made death more likely in cardiac patients. Warm-toned light, however, had no effect. Now they are studying whether orange-lensed glasses improve outcomes in actual patients.

Rural America needs more headache specialists, WVU researcher says

West Virginia has just half of the neurologists it needs. Headache specialists are even scarcer. David Watson, director of the WVU Headache Center, is exploring the barriers to care that people with migraine face, especially in states that—like West Virginia—are predominantly rural. His long-term goal is to attract and train so many neurologists to practice in West Virginia that no person with migraine would ever need to leave the state to seek treatment.