WVU research suggests conflicting drug laws may keep contaminated needles in circulation, contribute to hepatitis C infections

Acute hepatitis C infections rose 98 percent between 2010 and 2015 nationwide, largely because more people were injecting drugs. Using a new needle for every injection can slow the spread of hepatitis C, but getting those new needles isn’t always as simple as buying glucose-meter lancets at the pharmacy. And safely disposing of old needles presents a whole other set of problems.

Fentanyl deaths up 122 percent in West Virginia, say WVU researchers

West Virginia ranks first for fentanyl-related deaths, but it also leads the nation in a more optimistic way: its medical examiners pinpoint the cause of every drug-related death, and the relevant facts populate a unique statewide database. An interdisciplinary research team—involving the WVU School of Pharmacy, the WVU School of Public Health and the West Virginia Office of the Chief Medical Examiner—analyzed data and found that fentanyl deaths are up 122 percent in the state.

WVU researchers assess how a vegetarian diet can help prevent or control diabetes

As West Virginia University works toward becoming the world’s first Blue Zones Certified university, a graduate-student researcher in the WVU School of Public Health is exploring how one of the Blue Zone Project’s tenets—eating an abundance of vegetables—can make individuals with diabetes, and those at-risk of developing the condition, healthier.

WVU researchers awarded $1 million to develop AI technologies to combat opioid epidemic, trafficking

Yanfang (Fanny) Ye, assistant professor of computer science and electrical engineering at West Virginia University, has been awarded a grant from the National Institute of Justice in support of her work to develop novel artificial intelligence techniques to combat the opioid epidemic and trafficking. The award comes with about $1 million in funding over a three-year period.

WVU chemists find new frontier for pharmaceutical development

West Virginia University chemists have developed an experiment to improve the efficiency of creating new medicine. The research, conducted by Associate Professor of Chemistry Jessica Hoover and doctoral student Robert Crovak, was published earlier this year in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, a top chemistry-focused journal