WVU researchers identify how light at night may harm outcomes in cardiac patients

Orange-lensed glasses may be a simple, affordable way to help cardiac patients recover better, suggests research by Randy Nelson, chair of the WVU Department of Neuroscience, and Courtney DeVries, the John T. and June R. Chambers Chair of Oncology Research at WVU. Using animal models, they found that exposure to white light at night triggered inflammation, killed brain cells and made death more likely in cardiac patients. Warm-toned light, however, had no effect. Now they are studying whether orange-lensed glasses improve outcomes in actual patients.

Rural America needs more headache specialists, WVU researcher says

West Virginia has just half of the neurologists it needs. Headache specialists are even scarcer. David Watson, director of the WVU Headache Center, is exploring the barriers to care that people with migraine face, especially in states that—like West Virginia—are predominantly rural. His long-term goal is to attract and train so many neurologists to practice in West Virginia that no person with migraine would ever need to leave the state to seek treatment.

WVU researchers explore stroke’s effects on microbiome

A recent study by Allison Brichacek and Candice Brown, researchers in the West Virginia University School of Medicine, suggests that stroke patients’ microbiomes—and even the structure of their guts—may still be out of kilter a month after the stroke has passed.

WVU neuroscientist explores fighting weight gain with darkness

A novel way to treat weight gain may involve limiting our exposure to light at night—whether that light comes from our bedside lamps, the light pollution that sneaks through our windows or the electronic devices we use as we drift off to sleep.