Buying emergency contraception is legal but not always easy at small, mom-and-pop pharmacies

Just because it’s legal to buy emergency contraception over the counter doesn’t mean it’s easy. In a new study led by Amie Ashcraft—a researcher with the WVU School of Medicine—chain pharmacies were more likely than smaller, independent ones to keep emergency contraception in stock. Chain pharmacies also made it easier to access and provided more information about its effectiveness.

WVU and Pitt team up for laser trial to treat glaucoma

Glaucoma is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in the world. A new study to be conducted by the West Virginia University and the University of Pittsburgh seeks to change that. The National Eye Institute recently awarded the universities $15.2 million to study how a treatment called selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) can be better used to treat glaucoma.

Tweaking the chemical makeup of hydroxychloroquine beyond COVID-19

While the utility of hydroxychloroquine in the fight against COVID-19 is still unclear, it still helps millions of people around the world manage autoimmune diseases. Mark McLaughlin, a researcher with the WVU School of Pharmacy, and his colleagues are trying out new versions of the drug’s molecular structure to see if they can improve its benefit to patients.

WVU students testing positive for COVID-19 confirmed

Monongalia County Health Department and West Virginia University were notified that 13 new cases were reported today (July 2) with at least 10 WVU students who have tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

West Virginia University remembers Betty Puskar

Betty J. Puskar wanted to be remembered as someone who facilitated breast cancer care and for making breast cancer something that people talked about. She also wanted to be known as someone who helped people. A long-time supporter of West Virginia University and WVU Medicine, Puskar died at the age of 80 on Sunday, June 14 at her home in Morgantown.

To help West Virginia reopen safely, WVU researchers develop new COVID-19 tests

Researchers from the WVU School of Medicine have developed two new COVID-19 tests. One is a diagnostic test that detects the RNA of SARS-CoV-2—the virus that causes COVID-19—in nose-swab samples. The other is an antibody test that identifies a specific antibody to SARS-CoV-2 that plays a key role in blocking the virus from infiltrating healthy cells.