WVU students named Gilman Scholars

Six West Virginia University students will study or intern abroad this summer as Gilman Scholars. Wrenna Dorrer, Myya Helm, Iain MacKay, Morgan McCardell, Veronica Nicole and Juliana O'Reilly will gain skills that are critical to the country’s national security and economic prosperity while gaining an enriching cultural and career-building experience.

WVU’s HAPI Project/Healthy Start Program receives $5.47 million for next five years

The West Virginia Healthy Start/Helping Appalachian Parents and Infants Project received a total of $5.47 million in continued federal funding for the next five years through the Health Resources and Services Administration’s Healthy Start Initiative: Eliminating Disparities in Perinatal Health. Healthy Start aims to improve health outcomes before, during and after pregnancy, and to reduce racial and ethnic disparities in rates of infant death as well as negative health outcomes in the first 18 months of life.

WVU oncologist researches new treatment for cervical and vaginal cancers

Valerie Galvan Turner, a gynecologic oncologist at the West Virginia University Cancer Institute, has opened a randomized clinical trial to assess whether a novel supplemental treatment can help chemotherapy and radiation fight dangerous cervical and vaginal cancer better.

WVU board approves new policies governing ethics, identity theft and tobacco

The West Virginia University Board of Governors today (Feb. 8) gave final approval to a trio of updated policies, and also sent out for comment the latest updated rule as it works to complete policy revisions in the wake of the adoption of laws permitting more independence from the state Higher Education Policy Commission. The three rules, unanimously approved, deal with conflicts of interest, outside consulting and ethics; identify theft detection and prevention; and a tobacco-free campus.

WVU researchers pinpoint factor that predicts unplanned hospital readmissions

New research from West Virginia University suggests a widely used index to assess hospital patients’ risk of readmission may have a blind spot. Physicians and nurses use a tool called the “LACE index” to identify which patients are most likely to be readmitted to the hospital because symptoms come back or complications arise. But research out of the Health Sciences Center suggests the index fails to consider a key variables that could improve predictions in West Virginia: whether patients are on Medicaid.