WVU researchers pinpoint factor that predicts unplanned hospital readmissions

New research from West Virginia University suggests a widely used index to assess hospital patients’ risk of readmission may have a blind spot. Physicians and nurses use a tool called the “LACE index” to identify which patients are most likely to be readmitted to the hospital because symptoms come back or complications arise. But research out of the Health Sciences Center suggests the index fails to consider a key variables that could improve predictions in West Virginia: whether patients are on Medicaid.

WVU researchers investigate treating post-stroke depression with magnetic fields

Post-stroke depression stems from the cardiovascular changes in the brain that lead to a stroke in the first place. It’s a type of depression that scientists are just now starting to probe. At the West Virginia University School of Medicine, a team of researchers is taking a bench-to-bedside look at whether magnetic fields can help treat this unexplored mood disorder.

WVU study suggests loneliness can hinder management of diabetes, hypertension

One isn’t just the loneliest number. It may also be the unhealthiest. New research led by Laurie Theeke, a professor and nurse practitioner in the WVU School of Nursing, suggests that loneliness can make it harder for middle-aged Appalachians to manage chronic conditions such as diabetes, obesity and high blood pressure.

WVU Cancer Institute studies new treatment for colorectal cancer using novel drug combination

Richard Goldberg, who directs the West Virginia University Cancer Institute, is searching for new ways to slow colorectal cancer’s progression. In a recent study, he and an international team of scientists investigated a new drug combination for treating metastatic colorectal cancer in patients who had no—or only temporary—success with conventional chemotherapy treatments.

WVU researcher seeks vaccine to prevent lethal pneumonia

About half of all people with cystic fibrosis, the most common genetic disorder in the United States, die from a lung disease before they turn 40. A form of pneumonia called Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a likely culprit. These bacteria have become so hard to treat that the Centers for Disease Control deemed it a serious threat to the nation.

WVU researchers help West Virginia become first state to collect real-time data on neonatal abstinence syndrome

Amna Umer, an epidemiologist in the West Virginia University Department of Pediatrics, and her research team are working to circumvent barriers to effective healthcare for infants with neonatal-abstinence syndrome. In a recent project, they evaluated a new tool to collect real-time information on statewide NAS diagnoses and cases of fetal substance exposure. Their goal is to help make West Virginia the first state with such a system.