WVU researcher investigates risk for opioid overdose in rural West Virginia

Based at West Virginia University’s Eastern Campus in Martinsburg, Joy Buck, a WVU School of Nursing professor, and her collaborators will gather real-time data about overdose trends and assess the cultural barriers to—and facilitators of—overdose prevention. The findings gleaned from her pilot project may prove useful in other rural areas across the nation.

WVU Eye Institute expands, names prominent cornea specialist as director

West Virginia University has named Thomas Mauger to lead the WVU Eye Institute and serve as chair for the Department of Ophthalmology. He will also serve as associate dean for practice plan integration. Mauger is joined by his spouse, Carol Laxson, who will serve as assistant professor in the Department of Ophthalmology and as the director of diabetic retinopathy screening and prevention.

WVU biology student receives NASA grant to study the brain

Kaylynn Coates, a doctoral student in the West Virginia University Department of Biology, has received a grant from the NASA West Virginia Space Grant Consortium to study how serotonin neurons are regulated in the brain.

WVU, NIOSH partner to improve workplace health and safety

Through a new Scholar in Residence program at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Douglas Myers, an associate professor in the WVU School of Public Health, will serve as a primary liaison between the School and several local, regional and state partners. As a “guest researcher” with NIOSH, Myers will coordinate opportunities for faculty, students and researchers to collaborate and share ideas.

WVU researcher pursues updated vaccine against whooping cough

To remain effective, the pertussis vaccine must be modified to keep pace with evolving bacteria. As the vaccines' efficacy is declining, Heath Damron, an assistant professor in the WVU School of Medicine, is pursuing innovations to strengthen the vaccine and still keep it safe.

WVU research reveals clues on the cause of muscle fatigue in breast cancer patients

West Virginia University researchers may have uncovered the cause of muscle fatigue in breast cancer patients. Emidio Pistilli, Ph.D. A recent study led by Emidio Pistilli, Ph.D., associate professor in the WVU School of Medicine Division of Exercise Physiology and the Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Cell Biology, suggests that molecular alterations in the cell tissue of breast cancer patients may be the cause of fatigue in patients.

WVU researcher reveals new cell type in human brain that plays crucial role in visual search

Every day, people are asked to find something – a familiar face in a crowd, a child in the park, a particular house on a street. While researchers have long-since known that the ability to effectively search and detect goal-relevant targets is controlled by top-down signals from the brain’s frontal area, a researcher from West Virginia University has found evidence that the human medial temporal lobe – or MTL – also plays an essential role in this process.

Gee Mail: Unraveling the answers through research

In this edition of Gee Mail, President Gordon Gee visits with faculty and students conducting research across campus on a diverse plate of offerings — from poultry to forensics to neurosciences.