Cell-phone-sized device that stimulates nerve in neck may prevent migraine

Could applying a cell-phone-sized device to your neck three times a day prevent migraine attacks? WVU researcher Umer Najib thinks it might. In a new clinical trial, he’s testing how well a vagus nerve stimulator averts and relieves migraine symptoms. The noninvasive device showed promise in earlier animal studies. Now Najib wants to know if it works in actual migraine patients, too.

Cancer survivor pays it forward at Bob Huggins Fish Fry

When Angie Blankenship woke up following double mastectomy surgery, she was relieved to hear that her breast cancer had not spread to her lymph nodes. But, she said, “in that moment of jubilation, I also knew that we had the fight of healing.”

Memorial fund established by Coach Huggins advances West Virginia cancer care

WVU Men’s Basketball Coach Bob Huggins launched the Norma Mae Huggins Cancer Research Fund after his mother lost her battle with colon cancer in 2003. To date, the fund has raised about $5 million to support clinical research trials for cancer patients in West Virginia. But, to the patients and physicians impacted by those funds, the value is priceless.

Too much light may darken mood of hospital patients, say WVU researchers

This time of year can cause trouble for people with seasonal affective disorder, a type of depression that the waning daylight of autumn evokes. But new research by West Virginia University researchers Randy Nelson and Courtney DeVries suggests that getting too much light—instead of too little—may trigger depression, too.

Enter the exosome: WVU researcher studies how cancer and immune cells communicate

Cells can’t text each other the way we can, but they can still communicate. WVU School of Medicine researcher David Klinke is studying one means of their communication: tiny “packets” of information called exosomes. He’s focusing on the exosomes that cancer cells release. Deciphering them may suggest new targets for cancer immunotherapies.

WVU researchers study effects of new opioid law on doctors, pharmacists, patients

Treah Haggerty and Cara Sedney—researchers in the West Virginia University School of Medicine—are studying how a new West Virginia law has changed the way healthcare providers prescribe opioids. Working with the state’s Board of Pharmacy, they’re examining prescription practices before and after the law took effect on June 7, 2018, and pinpointing differences.