Meditation and music may improve memory of those at-risk for Alzheimer’s Disease

Kim Innes, an epidemiology professor from the West Virginia University School of Public Health, and her team are studying the potential benefits of a simple meditation or music listening practice for improving memory and cognitive functioning, as well as mood, sleep and quality of life in adults with subjective cognitive decline, or SCD.

WVU grad student wins AHA fellowship to study diabetes’ effects on the heart

Diabetics are at least twice as likely as nondiabetics to die of heart disease. They’re also at a greater risk of heart attack. With a two-year, $53,000 fellowship from the American Heart Association, Quincy Hathaway, a doctoral candidate in the West Virginia University School of Medicine, is examining how a certain protein, called PNPase, influences mitochondria’s performance in heart cells.

WVU researchers receive $2.38M grant for hybrid imaging system

Two West Virginia University School of Medicine researchers have received $2.38 million from the National Institutes of Health to build a one-of-a-kind pre-clinical imaging system that integrates PET-scan technology with a magnet-based imaging system that’s akin to MRI.

WVU researcher works to improve access to depression care in rural areas

West Virginia University researcher Robert Bossarte has received a $13.3-million award from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute to compare three treatment strategies for rural depressed patients: antidepressants alone; antidepressants combined with unguided cognitive behavior therapy provided online; and antidepressants combined with guided online cognitive behavior therapy.

WVU dermatologist develops app to help medical students spot skin cancer

A dermatologist may distinguish a mole from a tumor based on a glance, the way a cook can tell parsley from cilantro by sniffing it. But medical students don’t have enough experience to make such intuitive diagnoses. Michael Kolodney, who chairs West Virginia University’s Department of Dermatology, has developed a smartphone app to cultivate that intuition in medical students sooner.

WVU researcher studies quick blood test to help diagnose blood clots

Albeir Mousa, a professor of vascular surgery at West Virginia University, has used an innovative, faster method for ruling out DVT in patients before they have an ultrasound. He and his research team found that measuring the level of a specific protein—called D-dimer—in a patient’s blood may predict whether a time-intensive ultrasound is warranted. The “Annals of Vascular Surgery” has published the team’s results.