WVU expert to brief congressional panel on needle exchange

West Virginia University infectious disease expert Judith Feinberg, M.D., will participate in a briefing for members of Congress and their staffs on Capitol Hill Tuesday (April 24), at noon in the Congressional Visitor Center. Feinberg is the vice chair of the HIV Medicine Association and co-leader of a federally-funded project to reduce the incidence of infectious diseases in communities hard-hit by the opioid crisis.

WVU to offer graduate program in biomedical engineering

Building on the success of its undergraduate program, the West Virginia University Board of Governors has approved a graduate program in biomedical engineering. The program, which will award degrees at both the master’s and doctoral levels, will be offered in the Statler College of Engineering and Mineral Resources starting in the fall semester of this year.

WVU consolidates neuroscience research into new department

In a move to help improve people’s lives through innovation in fundamental neuroscience research and education, West Virginia University will bring together some 50 of its laboratories to form a new Department of Neuroscience within the School of Medicine.

Carl Schmidt, M.D., to join WVU Cancer Institute

WVU Medicine announced Tuesday (April 3) that Carl Schmidt, M.D., a nationally recognized surgical oncologist specializing in cancers of the liver, pancreas, and stomach will join the WVU Cancer Institute in July.

WVU researcher investigates role of misfolded proteins in Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Huntington’s disease

Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Huntington’s disease may have more in common than their effects on the functions of the brain and spinal cord. And finding that common thread could lead to a treatment that could work for all three. A recent study by David Smith, associate professor of biochemistry in the West Virginia University School of Medicine, suggests that at the heart of all three diseases may be misfolded proteins that are shaped in similar ways. His findings have been published in the journal Nature Communications.

WVU researcher explores connection between sepsis and dementia

Scientists don’t yet grasp the intricacies of the relationship between sepsis and dementia. Candice Brown, an assistant professor in West Virginia University’s School of Medicine and Rockefeller Neuroscience Institute, is studying that relationship in order to bring about insights that help prevent or mitigate the neurological impact of sepsis.

Science advocate, author to speak at WVU

Paul A. Offit, M.D., has built an international reputation defending science and medicine against attack. But he doesn’t think scientists never make mistakes. He’s planning to visit West Virginia University March 23 to talk about what we can learn from the laboratory mishaps of the past.

Businessman, entrepreneur Don Hoylman makes leadership gift commitment to WVU

Don Hoylman attributes the success of his three children to the education and opportunities they received as students at West Virginia University. He also credits WVU with being a positive driver for his vision and success in creating and growing his businesses. The Harrison County native and longtime Marion County resident, who has enjoyed a very successful career in the mining, gas and oil business, is now giving back to WVU with a transformational leadership donation through his trust.

WVU doctors and nurses work together to get tonsillectomy patients home faster

After having their tonsils removed, patients often can't leave the hospital for six hours, even if they bounce back from surgery sooner. Hospital policy commonly mandates a six-hour recovery time. But research led by Habib Zalzal, a resident in the West Virginia University School of Medicine, suggests that not all tonsillectomy patients have to wait that long.