WVU researchers explore stroke’s effects on microbiome

A recent study by Allison Brichacek and Candice Brown, researchers in the West Virginia University School of Medicine, suggests that stroke patients’ microbiomes—and even the structure of their guts—may still be out of kilter a month after the stroke has passed.

WVU researchers pursue blood test for colorectal cancer

Researchers at the West Virginia University Cancer Institute are evaluating a first-of-its-kind blood test for detecting colorectal cancer. Their findings may help propel the test toward inclusion in the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force’s recommendations for colorectal cancer screening.

WVU neuroscientist explores fighting weight gain with darkness

A novel way to treat weight gain may involve limiting our exposure to light at night—whether that light comes from our bedside lamps, the light pollution that sneaks through our windows or the electronic devices we use as we drift off to sleep.

WVU researcher explores what tumor cells and a healthy retina have in common

West Virginia University researcher Jianhai Du is parsing how the retina hijacks an energy-producing chemical reaction to churn out molecular building blocks to renew photoreceptor membranes that keep our vision sharp. His findings are published in the latest edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

WVU oncologist researches new treatment for cervical and vaginal cancers

Valerie Galvan Turner, a gynecologic oncologist at the West Virginia University Cancer Institute, has opened a randomized clinical trial to assess whether a novel supplemental treatment can help chemotherapy and radiation fight dangerous cervical and vaginal cancer better.

WVU researchers assess how a vegetarian diet can help prevent or control diabetes

As West Virginia University works toward becoming the world’s first Blue Zones Certified university, a graduate-student researcher in the WVU School of Public Health is exploring how one of the Blue Zone Project’s tenets—eating an abundance of vegetables—can make individuals with diabetes, and those at-risk of developing the condition, healthier.

WVU research addresses suicide risk in rural communities

Karissa Bjorkgren, a second-year student in the Master of Social Work and Master of Public Administration programs at West Virginia University, is dedicated to addressing mental health in rural communities. A native of Franklin, Bjorkgren has experienced first-hand how infrequently rural communities in West Virginia address mental health concerns. She hopes her research will help overcome this disparity.