$83.7 billion energy investment boosts state, WVU on world stage

West Virginia’s presence on the world energy stage jumped significantly Thursday (Nov. 9) as China Energy Investment Corp. Ltd., one of the world’s largest energy companies and a long-time research and development partner of West Virginia University, announced an agreement that will bring $83.7 billion to the state.

WVU to study possible geothermal use thanks to DoE grant

Every possible energy source exists within 100 miles of West Virginia University’s Morgantown campus, so it only makes sense that the University explores a variety of sustainable ways to heat and cool some 250 buildings on nearly 2,000 acres. And in keeping with its “Go First” motto, WVU could become home to the first geothermal direct-use heating and cooling system in the eastern United States.

WVU finishes first, third in national mine rescue contest

West Virginia University sent two teams to the Society for Mining, Metallurgy and Exploration–Eastern Collegiate Mine Rescue Organization National Mine Rescue Contest in Beckley October 27-28. Both ended up on the winner’s platform.

WVU to host North American Power Symposium

Representatives from more than 15 countries will head to West Virginia University Sept. 17-19 for the 49th annual North American Power Symposium at the Morgantown Marriott at Waterfront Place. NAPS provides an international forum for participants from academia and industry to present their research and development in power and energy with special attention to the latest advances and challenges in power and energy technologies.

WVU’s Watts Museum exhibit, open house explores coal mining mechanization

From late 19th century coal mining with picks and shovels to the huge longwall machines used today, mine mechanization has transformed underground coal mining from an industry once reliant upon muscle power to one now powered by machines. A new exhibition at West Virginia University’s Watts Museum showcases that transition.

WVU study of rare earth elements moves to second phase

The U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory has selected West Virginia University to move forward with its program to extract valuable rare earth elements, vital to the technology industry, from coal mining by-products. Phase two of the WVU project – which includes $3.38 million of federal and industry funding – will demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of extracting rare earth elements from acid mine drainage, or AMD.