Helicopter parents and ‘hothouse children’—WVU researcher explores the high stakes of family dynamics

Kristin Moilanen, associate professor of child development and family studies, said the phenomenon of helicopter parenting most often occurs in middle- to upper-class families where stakes are high for parents to be able to show off their children’s success. Her research, which focuses on young adults 18- to 24- years-old, indicates that high helicopter parenting leads to “low mastery, self-regulation and social competence.”

West Virginia University researchers want to up the game for nationwide physical education standards

Sacrificed by No Child Left Behind in favor of academic achievement, physical education requirements for public schools returned with the subsequent Every Student Succeeds Act in 2015, but that doesn’t mean that school systems have consistent—or adequate—standards for their students. That lack sends a critical message to the public and to stakeholders, according to West Virginia University researchers.

Four WVU professors awarded Fulbright grants

Nicholas Bowman, Jay Krehbiel, Tamba M'Bayo and Angel Tuninetti, all from the Eberly College of Arts and Sciences, have received grants from the U.S. Fulbright Scholar Program to conduct research abroad.