WVU students receive NASA Space Grant fellowships

Each student will receive a $1,000 award: $500 from the Eberly College and $500 from the NASA West Virginia Space Grant Consortium. The recipients are Erica Chwalik, Dillion Cottrill, Ryan Culp, Brenden Glover, Janna Kleinsasser, Maxwell Reese, Simon Wirth and Olivia Young.

Reimagining information processing

West Virginia University physicists Cheng Cen, Lian Li, Yanjun Ma, Ming Yang and Chenhui Yan are looking beyond the limits of classical computing used in our everyday devices and are working toward making quantum device applications widely accessible

WVU astronomer to study the ‘extreme universe’ with international team

A West Virginia University astronomer is working to locate the origin of fast radio bursts coming from outside the Milky Way Galaxy. Sarah Burke-Spolaor, an assistant professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy, has accepted a distinguished fellowship with the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research Azrieli Global Scholars Program

Yet again, Einstein’s theory passes the test with flying colors

An international team of astronomers, which includes Duncan Lorimer, West Virginia University professor of physics and astronomy, has tested Einstein’s theory using three stars orbiting each other: a neutron star and two white dwarfs. Their findings, published in “Nature”, prove that Einstein’s theory still passes the test in such extreme conditions.

WVU physicist receives prestigious NSF CAREER Award

Weichao Tu, an assistant professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at West Virginia University, has been awarded the prestigious National Science Foundation CAREER Award to support her research in developing the first comprehensive model to simulate the mysterious dropout of the radiation belt electrons

WVU professors bring the scientific community closer to understanding binary star mergers

Maura McLaughlin and Duncan Lorimer, professors of physics and astronomy at West Virginia University, have discovered a new pair of pulsars and have followed up on characteristics of another new duo. Their research will bring insights into the understanding of the how many of these systems exist and the rate in which they merge in our galaxy.

WVU physicists among collaborators granted $7 million to form U.S. Department of Energy center of excellence

Scientists pause each afternoon at Kirtland Air Force Base in Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, awaiting the daily lightning flash and unmistakable floor jolt that accompanies a Z shot. West Virginia University physics professor Mark Koepke and his students are often among them, taking advantage of approximately 20 of the more than 200 Z shots per year to examine the physical principles that govern extreme astrophysical environments through the study of high energy density physics.