WVU researchers study factors that affect stream water quality

Clean water is indispensable for human health, and human activity plays a large role water quality. West Virginia University researchers have compared that circular relationship in watersheds affected by different water movement and external factors to identify the dominant controls of stream water quality and ecosystem health.

WVU achieves 2018 Tree Campus USA designation, invites campus community to Arbor Day planting

West Virginia University’s commitment to effective urban forest management was fast-tracked throughout the last year, enhancing the look and feel of campus by preserving campus trees and planning for the planting of dozens of new trees to replace canopy cover lost to pests and age. The work has earned WVU a Tree Campus USA designation, making it one of 364 campuses to have the title.

WVU College of Law named a top environmental law school for second year

The West Virginia University College of Law has been named a top environmental law school for a second year. In its current issue, preLaw Magazine gives WVU College of Law a grade of A for the range of its energy and environmental law classes and related opportunities. Just 14 law schools in the nation score higher.

WVU researcher unearths an ice age in the African desert

A field trip to Namibia to study volcanic rocks led to an unexpected discovery by West Virginia University geologists Graham Andrews and Sarah Brown. While exploring the desert country in southern Africa, they stumbled upon a peculiar land formation—flat desert scattered with hundreds of long, steep hills. They quickly realized the bumpy landscape was shaped by drumlins, a type of hill often found in places once covered in glaciers, an abnormal characteristic for desert landscapes.

New research suggests forests, like humans, require a balanced diet

The world’s forests are on a fast food diet of carbon dioxide, which is currently causing them to grow faster. But a researcher at West Virginia University, along with an international team of scientists, finds evidence suggesting that forest growth may soon peak as the trees deplete nitrogen in the soil over longer growing seasons.