WVU physicists chase new ‘wave’ of condensed matter research

Just one year after arriving at West Virginia University, physicist Lian Li is taking physics research to new frontiers. In collaboration with fellow WVU condensed matter experiment expert Cheng Cen, he is breaking the rules of classical physics in search of a solution to making computers faster than ever.

Discovering the art of waste: WVU English professor named a fellow of the National Humanities Center

Stephanie Foote is the first West Virginia University faculty member to be chosen for a National Humanities Center Fellowship. Foote is in residence at the National Humanities Center in Durham, North Carolina, for the 2017-18 academic year while working on her book about waste. In “The Art of Waste: Narrative, Trash, and Contemporary Culture,” Foote plans to examine the role of garbage in narrating the relationship of American culture to environmental crisis.

WVU Constitution Day program Sept. 18 will address freedom of the press

West Virginia University’s annual observance of Constitution Day this year will focus on the role of a free press in a democratic society. A Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist will join WVU communications, journalism and law professors to address the erosion of the First Amendment, fake news, and why a free press is necessary for a strong democracy.

WVU Dept. of History to host 7th annual Sen. Rush D. Holt guest lecture

The Department of History at West Virginia University will feature historian and religious studies scholar Jon Butler for its annual Sen. Rush D. Holt Lecture Series. Butler will present his lecture, “Protestantism, American Religion and the Unanticipated Reformation,” Sept. 26 at 7:30 p.m. in G9 White Hall. The event is free and open to the public.

WVU professor plays key role in telescope program that will map the history of the Universe

Since the early 1900s scientists have known that the Universe is expanding but recent studies have shown that the rate of expansion is accelerating. The reason for this is currently unknown; however, Kevin Bandura, an assistant professor in the Lane Department of Computer and Electrical Engineering at West Virginia University, has been working on the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment, or CHIME, for the past several years to solve the mystery.