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MEDIA KIT: WVU professor’s patented system could save lives and make cities more resilient after natural disasters

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West Virginia University professor Hota GangaRao and Praveen Majjigapu, a Ph.D. student in civil engineering, have developed a system that will increase the strength and endurance of structures in earthquakes, hurricanes, tornadoes and other large blasts, helping communities prevent catastrophe. The system is also beneficial for repairing historic or aging structures.

Hota GangaRao and Praveen Majjigapu inspect structure after WVU lab test.
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Biographies:



Link to May 18, 2017 news release:

WVU professor’s patented system could save lives and make cities more resilient after natural disasters

Related news releases:

WVU receives more than $1 million from the National Science Foundation for composite material research

WVU center develops wrap treatment to remedy state's bridge deficiencies

Other links:

Hota GangaRao's Academic Media Day profile and presentation

Benjamin M. Statler College of Engineering and Mineral Resources

Photos:

Hota GangaRao photos
Hota GangaRaoHota GangaRao  

Praveen Majjigapu photos
Praveen MajjigapuPraveen Majjigapu

Bonding and gluing photos

The research team in Hota GangaRao’s lab at West Virginia University bonds filler modules — white, wedge-shaped pieces — to a concrete joint.

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The research team in Hota GangaRao’s lab at West Virginia University applies resin to the concrete structure and pieces of composite wrap.

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Cutting photos

The research team in Hota GangaRao’s lab at West Virginia University cuts large pieces of composite wrap.

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Wrapping photos

The research team in Hota GangaRao’s lab at West Virginia University apply resin and pieces of composite wrap to the concrete structure.

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Instrumentation photos

The research team in Hota GangaRao’s lab at West Virginia University attach gauges to the wrapped concrete structure to measure strain and tension.

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Testing photos

Hota GangaRao and his research team at West Virginia University test a wrapped concrete structure to failure

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Video (b-roll):

Bonding and gluing


Cutting of fabric


Wrapping


Instrumentation


Testing of structure


Video (interviews):

Hota GangaRao interview


Praveen Majjigapu interview


Interview with David White, Vice President of Technical Services, Sika Corporation


Interview with John Clarkson, Senior Reviewer, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers


Video (other):

Mountaineers Go First: Hota GangaRao