Articles tagged with: HealthSciences

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  • A 2009 WVU School of Nursing graduate, Tiffany Hamilton answered a call for nurses to travel to the earthquake-stricken island. Thousands of people injured during the earthquake in January were desperate for medical care.
  • The West Virginia University School of Dentistry will celebrate National Children?s Dental Health Month by providing free examinations to children on Friday, Feb. 12 in the WVU Pediatric Dentistry Clinic. The exams are offered for children ages 1 to 17 from 8:45 a.m. to noon and 1 to 3:45 p.m.
  • When Ann Chester was in seventh grade, her teachers told her, "You're not going to college." She couldn't believe it. She'd always been a good student, always believed her path led to the door of a university. But someone had misread her test scores, and she ended up in a class full of underachievers. Soon, she was underachieving, too.
  • Michael Hendryx, Ph.D., director of the WVU Rural Health Research Center, is one of a group of scientists whose research has led to a call for a moratorium on permits for mountaintop mining. In this week's edition of the journal Science, they argue that peer-reviewed research unequivocally documents irreversible environmental impacts from this form of mining which also exposes local residents to a higher risk of serious health problems.
  • WVU Hospitals' Sleep Evaluation Center has been fully accredited by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM).
  • For decades, chemotherapy has been helping people beat cancer. But not everyone who takes the cancer killing drugs escapes their side effects. A new study at West Virginia University will literally be music to the ears of patients who are experiencing the two most distressing side effects - nausea and vomiting.
  • President James P. Clements was joined by the newest members of his executive team Monday at the first Faculty Senate meeting of the spring semester, all stressing the need for cooperative planning across the University as a new strategic plan is being developed.
  • West Virginia University's latest national television spot features one of the world's leading experts on sports-related brain injuries-- WVU Chair of Neurosurgery Dr. Julian Bailes
  • It's one of the highest levels of recognition a hospital can achieve. The American Nurses Credentialing Center has once again named WVU Hospitals a recipient of the Magnet award for excellence in nursing services. WVUH became the first and only West Virginia hospital to achieve such recognition when it was originally recognized with the Magnet award in 2005. Hospitals undergo a rigorous reevaluation every four years.
  • Steven M. Frisch, Ph.D., of the WVU School of Medicine has been appointed to the editorial board of Cancer Research, the most frequently cited cancer research journal in the world.
  • The West Virginia University School of Pharmacy is one of only two schools nationwide to receive $1.5 million over the next three years to continue studies of the state?s health disparities. The grant involves faculty collaboration from all four health professions schools at WVU: pharmacy, dentistry, nursing and medicine.
  • Women in their 40s nationwide are questioning whether they should avoid getting mammograms to screen for breast cancer now that a government panel of doctors and scientists has said the tests in younger women don't improve women's survival rates. But cancer doctors at the Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center at West Virginia University say they are advising women not to wait until age 50 to seek their first mammograms. Despite the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation that women age 40 to 50 do without screening mammography, others see lifesaving benefits in the screening.
  • For the second year in a row, the West Virginia University Children's Hospital radiothon raised more than $120,000. The Q for Kids Radiothon, which was hosted by WVU Children's Hospital, Children's Miracle Network and three area radio stations was held from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. Nov. 18 and 19 and from 6 a.m. to noon Nov. 20.
  • Want to make your holiday meal healthier without saying goodbye to your traditional menu items? The West Virginia University School of Pharmacy Health Education Center will present a free healthy holiday cooking class Dec. 2 from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at Suncrest United Methodist Church, 479 Van Voorhis Road.
  • The newest edition of the Monti Bear series is now available at West Virginia University Hospital's Friends Gift Shop. Hug-A-Bear sells for $38.99, and a portion of that price tag will be donated to the Norma Mae Huggins Cancer Research Foundation at the Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center at WVU.
  • For the third consecutive year, West Virginia University Hospitals, in conjunction with the Center for Organ Recovery and Education, received a U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Medal of Honor for increasing organ donation rates.
  • Three new Recovery Act grants will provide more than $1.1 million to the West Virginia University Center for Neurosciences this year, says George Spirou, Ph.D., who leads the organization and is principal investigator on all three grants. The extra funds from National Institutes of Health will allow the center to hire five researchers, support research on the development of cells in the nervous system and strengthen core laboratories.
  • For West Virginia University School of Dentistry student Zach Sisler, the required rural rotation is about helping people who may have not been able to afford the dental care they need. Sisler is completing his rural rotation in Berkeley Springs.
  • Living with a health condition can fill your mind with questions about its treatment and management. A new program by the WVU School of Pharmacy aims to ease your worries and answer questions.
  • Patricia Chase, dean of the West Virginia University School of Pharmacy, will lead a national search for the new dean of the WVU School of Medicine, Chancellor for Health Sciences Christopher Colenda announced Thursday at a forum for faculty and staff.